Horse Riding Trail Markers and Maps

If you have lengthy trails that traverse wooded areas or the route is less apparent, markers and even a map might be necessary.
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No one likes the feeling of getting lost. It can be frightening for the rider and his/her family. Providing guideposts ensures everyone’s safety and enjoyment.

Got trails on your land? Depending on how long or complicated the trail system is, you might need markers and a map. 

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Short, loop trails or wide-open spaces where paths are obvious likely don’t need signage. 

Lengthy trails that traverse wooded areas or the route is less apparent, markers and even a map might be necessary. No one likes the feeling of getting lost; it can be frightening for the rider and his/her family. Provide guideposts or maps to ensure everyone’s safety and enjoyment.

Here’s a few ideas for marking trails on your property:

  • Place markers at a height where they are easily seen. Hiking trails typically place them at eye level, slightly higher to account for horseback might be better suited to horse trails.
  • Use spray paint to mark trees with enough frequency to make the way obvious.
  • Use trail marking tape that can be tied around branches or trees.
  • Post no trespassing signs for private lands to notify snowmobilers, ATV riders, cyclists and hikers that the trail is closed for their use.
  • For long trails, consider purchasing official trail markers that are nailed or clipped to the trees. They can be purchased in multiple colors to denote different trails and can also include distance markers.
  • Make a map of the trails on your property using Google Earth and a GPS phone app (such as Motion X GPS). Once done, you can print and post those maps in the barn or print copies riders can carry with them.

Inspect trail markers throughout the season to make sure they haven’t fallen off or become covered with leaves or snow. If they aren’t visible or have disappeared, they aren’t useful. 

If you allow users other than boarders on your trails, you might also want to include signage with your name and contact information in case of an emergency and require signed releases.

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